Free shipping on orders over $30

Bag 0

Your cart

You're $6 away from free shipping


The Bottom Line.

Makeup shouldn’t be bad for you. Clean beauty means products that don't do any harm to your body, or the environment.

The No List

What's up with FDA regulations?

The European Union has banned over 1,300 ingredients and raw materials commonly used in beauty products, the United States has banned only 11. Those numbers again…

1300 v's' 11 (?!)

There hasn’t been a new FDA cosmetic regulation since 1938, that's 80 years. Think about all the ways the world has advanced in the last 80 years - the internet was born, iPhones have had 10 different versions, and robots are answering our questions online, and yet no regulations on our cosmetics. Nuts!

Because there are no regulations, beauty brands are self regulating and getting away with disguising toxic ingredients with murky language.

There is no clarity on what the difference between natural, organic, green and clean is, nor is there any education around ingredient regulations and what we should be looking out for.

Basically that means people don’t know what is toxic and what is not. So we're going to unpack what this actually means for you and the environment.

We stand on clean being the only way forward.
1.
Be
better

We believe we can always be better with our ingredients, our packaging, our products and our process. Sustainability is a moving target which means that we need to be flexible and agile in our approach. It starts with us stepping up.

2.
Knowledge
is power

Clean for us starts with education — we believe that knowledge is empowering and gives people the confidence to make good decisions. We care about the big picture and sharing what goes on behind the scenes in the beauty industry. We want everyone to know what goes into their makeup— what the good stuff is, why we use it and what the bad stuff is and why we’ll never use it.

3.
Question
everything

Are our beauty products really that bad for us? Why should we care? Is clean beauty a scam? What are endocrine disruptors? What’s the deal with carcinogens?

We're asking all of the questions.

As a brand we want to lead the charge on innovation in the beauty world, in order to do that we need to be forever curious. We question our labs, our suppliers, our ingredient specialists, our packing warehouses, our recycling partners, even ourselves. Saie believes curiosity is rewarded.

Get familiar with
the no list

We’ll never use
this bad stuff.

We care about the big picture — here is a breakdown on what harm these ingredients actually do and why it's important to learn about them.

Butylated Hydroxyanisole (BHA)

What is it:
Synthetic antioxidants that are preservatives to prevent oils from going bad.
Often disguised as:
butylated hydroxyanisole, butylated hydroxytoluene
Why we don't use:
A preservative linked to skin irritation, cancer, kidney, thyroid and liver problems, and hormone disruption.

Chemical Sunscreens

What is it:
Chemical Sunscreens contain organic (carbon based) compounds which create a chemical reaction and work by changing UV rays into heat, then releasing that heat from the skin. They are often referred to as chemical or organic absorbers.
Often disguised as:
Oxybenzone (or Benzophenone-3) Octinoxate (or octyl methoxycinnamate) Octocrylene Octisalate Homosalate
Why we don't use:
We are not developing products that require these ingredients but if we ever do we'll never use this ingredient— we just wanted you to know!

Petroleum-derived ingredients

What is it:
These are basically plastic. There is so much that can be distilled from petroleum, things like preservatives, gelifying agents, solvers and stabilizers. They are tough to nail down because they are so easily disguised.
Often disguised as:
Mineral oil, petrolatum, paraffin, polypropylene, phenoxyethanol, polyethylene, vaseline, baby oil, petroleum jelly.
Why we don't use:
Because this is essentially putting a clear liquid version of plastic on your face. There are about a thousand reasons to avoid petroleum products from an environmental standpoint but in terms of our bodies, they are known organ disruptors. There are many cleverly disguised ingredients under this category that claim to be clean so we are doing our ingredient testing with Gay Timmons to make sure there are no disguised petroleum derivatives. Petroleum is film-forming on the skin and it can aggravate or prolong acne.
What we use instead:
It’s really hard to not use these but it’s what sets us apart as truly clean. We use natural oils and waxes, coconut oil, lanolin and glycerin. They don’t have the same properties which is why development becomes a balancing act trying to achieve the look without it being heavy or sticky.

GMO's

What is it:
You've probably heard about GMO's in your food, but GMOs in your skin care or cosmetic products? How could that happen? These are kind of similar to food, if something is genetically modified and it’s been altered using genetic engineering. It just as harmful what you’re putting on your body as what you’re putting in your body.
Often disguised as:
Canola, Corn, Cotton, Soy, Maltodextrins, Ethanol (if derived from corn or GMO sugar beets), Sucrose (if derived from sugar beets), Molasses (if derived from sugar beets), Amino acids, Yeast products
Why we don't use:
Cosmetic ingredients are not routinely tested for GMOs mainly due to the high testing costs, the availability of alternative non-GMO (e.g. synthetic) ingredients, and the low risk profile as cosmetics are applied only externally. Aside from that they are linked with many problems including infertility, immune problems, accelerated aging, insulin regulation, and changes in the liver, kidney, spleen, and digestive system. In addition, studies have linked GM foods with asthma, allergies, inflammation, and intestinal damage.

Parabens

What is it:
Preservative to keep formulas fresh.
Often disguised as:
Methylparaben (E number E218), ethylparaben (E214), propylparaben (E216), butylparaben and heptylparaben (E209) isobutylparaben, isopropylparaben, benzylparaben and their sodium salts.
Why we don't use:
Typically they extend the shelf life of products. Parabens are a group of preservatives that prevent the growth of bad bacteria and mold in your beauty products. They mimic estrogen in the human body, and are linked to reproductive organ harm, thyroid disruption, hormone-related cancers, and obesity.
What we use instead:
We use naturally derived preservatives wherever possible. We use Caprylyl Glycol — an alcohol derived from caprylic acid, a natural fatty acid found in the milk of some mammals, palm and coconut oil. Ours is naturally derived. Radish Root Ferment Filtrate —a preservative created by fermenting radish roots. Phenethyl Alcohol which is made by isolating the bark and branches of cinnamomum cassia by water steam distillation. Potassium Sorbate — a salt synthetically produced from sorbic acid and potassium hydroxide. Sodium Benzoate — preservative to keep the formula fresh that is naturally derived.

Phthalates

What is it:
Phthalates are industrial plasticizers in cosmetics. They are widely used in personal care products to moisturize and soften skin, to dissolve and combine ingredients. Phthalates also enhance elasticity and they make products flexible when you apply them.
Often disguised as:
DEHP (di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate) DMP (dimethyl phthalate) BBP (benzyl butyl phthalate) DNOP (di-n-octyl phthalate)
Why we don't use:
Whenever you see the term fragrance this usually means there are hidden Phthalates which have been linked to reproductive and hormonal harm in children and men. Some studies have linked phthalates to breast cancers, reproductive malformation, and infertility.
What we use instead:
Shea Butter, Murumuru seed butter squalane oil, Castor Oil, Carnauba wax, Jojoba oil, Vitamin E.

Sulfates

What is it:
Sulfates are surfactants – molecules that can attract both oil and water: One end of the molecule clings to the oily dirt, while the other clings to water. Translation? They can lift the grease and grime off of our skin and hair, dissolve (emulsify) it into solution and then rinse everything down the drain.
Often disguised as:
"Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES) Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate Sodium Lauroyl Isoethionate Sodium Lauroyl Taurate Sodium Cocoyl Isoethionate Sodium Lauroyl Methyl Isoethionate Sodium Lauroyl Sarcosinate Disodium Laureth Sulfosuccinate"
Why we don't use:
Sulfates are powerful, cheap and everywhere. Sulfates are mostly used for hair products which we don't have but we promise to never develop any of our future products with sulfates.

Synthetic fragrance or flavor

What is it:
Fragrance is the problem child ingredient in traditional beauty products. It is a catchall term that can disguise up to 3,000 synthetic or natural chemicals used to make a beauty product smell delicious.
Often disguised as:
Fragrance
Why we don't use:
Whenever you see the term fragrance this usually means there are hidden Phthalates which have been linked to reproductive and hormonal harm in children and men. Some studies have linked phthalates to breast cancers, reproductive malformation, and infertility.
What we use instead:
We use naturally derived flavors and fragrances or essential oils. In our liquid Lip Balm we have a naturally derived coconut flavor.

Talc

What is it:
Talc is a natural mineral—the softest mineral on record—and is used in everything from paints to textiles to drugs to, you guessed it, cosmetics. It is matifying, absorbs oils and gives formulas a soft powdery texture. Most makeup brands use this for powders and eye shadow
Often disguised as:
Hydrous magnesium silicate
Why we don't use:
Talc has become very controversial with all the recent reports which you have probably heard of. It's important to note that there are 2 kinds of talc, one that isn't commonly used but was found to have asbestos in it. Yikes! The other kind hasn't been found to be a known carcinogen, and while asbestos-contaminated talc is a danger for talc miners or other workers who come in contact with natural talc fibers, it is not a concern specifically for cosmetics but we still want to stay away from it.
What we use instead:
We’re going to stay away from it, we don’t think we need to use it to create nice powders. Instead we use silica and mica. When you break down mica, it breaks down flat—like a mirror—so, depending on the particle size, you can go from club glitter to frosty to illuminating to just glowy. When you rub mica into your skin, it disappears.

- Show Hide Whole List

Hydrogenated Polyisobutene, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Petroleum, Paraffin, Mineral Oil, Formadehyde (Quaternium-15, DMDM Hydantoin, Imidazolidinyl urea, Diazolidinyl urea, Sodium Hydroxymethylglycinate, 2-Bromo-2-Nitropropane-1,3 Diol, Glyoxal, and Oxaldehyde), Hydroquinone, Mercury (Thimerosal and Merthiolate), Isobutylparaben, Butyl Paraben, Methylparaben, Propylparaben, Phthalates (DBP, DEHP, DEP), Synthetic Fragrance / Parfum, Propylene Glycol, Triclosan, Benzene, Toluene, Benzalkonium Chloride, Bisphenol A (BPA), Butoxyethanol, BHA, BHT, Bismuth Oxychloride, Coal Tar (Aminophenol, Diaminobenzene, Phenylenediamine), Cyclomethicone, Dimethicone, Diazolidinyl Urea, Imidazolinidyl Urea, Diethanolamine, Cocamide, Triethanolamine, EDTA (Ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid), Methyl Cellosolve, Methoxyethanol, Oxybenzone, Phenoxyethanol, PVP/VA Copolymer, Retinyl Palmitate, Retinol, Talc, Parafin Wax, Polyethylene Glycol, Butyl Alcohol, Butylene Glycol (petroleum derived is not ok, naturally derived is), Propylene Glycol, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Propyl Alcohol, Polyethylene, Polypropylene, Ethylene Copolymer, Propylene Copolymer, Polybutene, Ethylene/Propylene/Styrene Copolymer, Butylene/Ethylene/Styrene Copolymer, Animal Fat, Animal Musk, Nanoparticles, Placenta Extract, Polysorbates, Triclosan

Our Practices
Ingredients